General ramblings

Excuse me, there's a draft…

March 27, 2014

Drafts. We all hate them. And they are a huge culprit in allowing the hard earned heat we pump into our homes, to leak out.
So how do you stop them?

Draft excluders-the clue is in the name.
Apparently the humble draft excluder can save you 15% of your total heating bill-if that is true, that is mental.
If you don’t have one, you need to get one. Or better yet, make yourself one.
Depending on your skill set, you can knit one, crochet one, or sew one that looks like a dog/snake/a giant pencil.

And if that is beyond you-take an old pair of jeans, hack off one leg, stuff with old-tshirts and tights and pants etc, and then wrap an elastic band around each end. It won’t look that great, but it will do the job and cost you nothing!
And how is this for the cleverest idea EVER-a draught excluder that moves with your door!

One very talented lady on Twitter has made one of these herself, so no excuses!

Draft excluding strips-to go around your doors and windows

Chimney Pillows-you stuff these up your chimney and inflate them. NB. Only use if you don’t have a fire…

Screen Shot 2014-03-26 at 13.25.07

Floorboard Gap Stoppers-these look pretty nifty, and from the looks of it, you just poke ’em down the gaps in your floorboards. You could also try wedged up bits of paper, but I guess this is cosmetically more pleasing and less frustrating than trying to ball up paper small enough to fit

Screen Shot 2014-03-26 at 13.27.25

An Ecoflap-to stop the draft coming through your letterbox. And it’s a British invention (surely only the Brits could invent such a thing..!)

 

Sash Window Gap Seal-if you have sash windows, and you have gaps, then you need Sash Window Gap Seal! (My next career move may well be advertising)

If you want some more DIY type ideas, then checkout this great site I found called Green It Yourself. There is a whole section on GIY (get it?!) draft-proofing.This site is awesome, I may lose days in there, composing a huge list of GIY projects for hubby….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Reply smallholderwannabe March 28, 2014 at 8:31 am

    We have a through draft at floor level in the living room that would clean corn (phrase from when I was a kid). We have tongue and groove floorboards (so no gaps between them), a thick layer of newspaper, good underlay and then carpet. The gaps around the skirting board are plugged. I keep and old and holey rug rolled up under the sofa (where it isn’t seen) to stop some of the draft. Anybody have any ideas, please?

    • Reply Jen March 28, 2014 at 1:42 pm

      Where is it coming from? Under the door, or around it? Or from the windows? Or the fireplace?

      • Reply smallholderwannabe March 29, 2014 at 11:57 am

        The draft is not from the window or the door. We have a woodburner so there is no draft from the fireplace. The draft is across the floor. We are puzzled. If we knew where it is coming from, then we could do something about it.

        • Reply Jen March 30, 2014 at 10:42 am

          Very strange!

  • Reply Hazel March 27, 2014 at 7:26 pm

    An old pillow in a bin bag works just as well and is considerabley cheaper than a chimney balloon

    • Reply Jen March 27, 2014 at 8:27 pm

      Good tip-thanks Hazel!

  • Reply KathrynH March 27, 2014 at 11:42 am

    Completely unrelated to draughts I just wanted to let you know I’ve just done a (live) interview on BBC Radio Wilts about this Saturday’s Repair Cafe in Corsham and, of course, gave you a plug as being the original inspiration! They said they knew you already!!

    • Reply Jen March 27, 2014 at 5:09 pm

      I hound them regularly to allow me to come on and bore the pants off the good people of Wiltshire with all my tales of Make Do and Mend!
      So pleased to hear the Repair Cafe in Corsham is taking off-great job 🙂

  • Reply sandyfaithking March 27, 2014 at 8:10 am

    Sometimes in older buildings if you try to stop all the draughts you end up with mildew on the walls, which is a health hazard. These old buildings, unfortunately, were never built with contemporary central heating in mind. That makes it a very tricky situation – I’m guessing that in those circumstances the best idea is to get good insulation but to allow the air to move via vents or something. I just wanted to add my tuppence-worth because we used to live in a 200 year old house and had terrible problems with mildew.

    • Reply Jen March 27, 2014 at 5:08 pm

      That’s interesting, thankyou. We have been warned against over-insulating the loft etc in case the timbers rot and the house falls down!

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